Dinosaur and Prehistoric Animal Site - Robert I. Carr

Dinosaur skeleton: Skeleton of tyrannosaurus rex, a huge meat eating dynosaur of the Cretaceous period that grew over 40 feet long and 20 feet tall, with large sharp teeth and claws. Main entrance hall, Museum of Nature and Science, Denver, Colorado 2005.
Dinosaur skeleton: Ankylosaur, gargoyleosaurus parkpini, was a heavily armored plant eater living 145 million years ago, in the late Jurassic period. Denver Museum of Nature and Science, December 2005.
Dinosaur skeleton: Ankylosaur, gargoyleosaurus parkpini, was a heavily armored plant eater living 145 million years ago, in the late Jurassic period. Denver Museum of Nature and Science, December 2005.
Dinosaur skeleton: Duckbilled dinosaurs - hadrosaurs - were plant eaters who lived in groups. This one is 66 million years old and survived a battle with a tyranosaurus rex that left a scar midway back on its tail. It probably browsed/grazed on all four legs, but it could run on its hind legs if it had to. Lower right is skeleton of a triceratops head. Denver Museum of Nature and Science, December 2005.
Dinosaur skeleton : Diplodocus tongus, a long-necked dinosaur of the late Jurassic Period, 150 million years ago, from the Morrison Formation, Uinta County, Utah. The diplodocus were sauropods, which were plant eaters and the largest land animals ever, thriving worldwide. Denver Museum of Nature and Science, December 2005.
Dinosaur skeleton: Pteranodons were flying reptiles that lived near the sea, catching and eating fish the way sea birds do today. Late Cretaceous Period, 85 million years ago, found in Niobrara Chalk, Lane County, Kansas. Denver Museum of Nature and Science, Denver, Colorado December 2005.
Dinosaur/dinosaur genera: Dimetrodon attacking an Eryops, both living during the Permian period 245-280 million years ago, long before the dinosaurs evolved. Dimetrodon was a mammal-like reptile, an ancestor of mammals, about 11 feet long weighing 500+ pounds, with a large sale-like flap of skin along its back supported by long, bony spines. It had sharp teeth and clawed feet. The Eryops was a common, primitive amphibian living in swamps, a meat eater with stout body and very wide ribs. It was 5 feet long, a large land animal for its time. Museum of Nature and Science, Denver, Colorado 2005.
Dinosaur/dinosaur genera: Dimetrodon attacking an Eryops, both living during the Permian period 245-280 million years ago, long before the dinosaurs evolved. Dimetrodon was a mammal-like reptile, an ancestor of mammals, about 11 feet long weighing 500+ pounds, with a large sale-like flap of skin along its back supported by long, bony spines. It had sharp teeth and clawed feet. The Eryops was a common, primitive amphibian living in swamps, a meat eater with stout body and very wide ribs. It was 5 feet long, a large land animal for its time. Museum of Nature and Science, Denver, Colorado 2005.
Dinosaur skeleton: Diplodocus tongus, a long-necked dinosaur of the late Jurassic Period, 150 million years ago, from the Morrison Formation, Uinta County, Utah. The diplodocus were sauropods, which were plant eaters and the largest land animals ever, thriving worldwide. Denver Museum of Nature and Science, December 2005.
Dinosaur skeleton: Skeleton of tyrannosaurus rex, a huge meat eating dynosaur of the Cretaceous period that grew over 40 feet long and 20 feet tall, with large sharp teeth and claws. Main entrance hall, Museum of Nature and Science, Denver, Colorado 2005.
Dinosaur skeleton: Ankylosaur, gargoyleosaurus parkpini, was a heavily armored plant eater living 145 million years ago, in the late Jurassic period. Denver Museum of Nature and Science, December 2005.

Edit caption:


Save Cancel
Dinosaur skeleton: Ankylosaur, gargoyleosaurus parkpini, was a heavily armored plant eater living 145 million years ago, in the late Jurassic period. Denver Museum of Nature and Science, December 2005.
Dinosaur skeleton: Ankylosaur, gargoyleosaurus parkpini, was a heavily armored plant eater living 145 million years ago, in the late Jurassic period. Denver Museum of Nature and Science, December 2005.

Edit caption:


Save Cancel
See photo in original gallery.

<

Click below for links to other photography web sites.

Wildlife Photography Webring

Next

Random

List

Photography Directory - Links to Photography Websites
Photography Directory
Photography Links
PhotographySites
Nature Photographers

Member of the Landscape Photographers List, the Architecture Photographers List, and the Digital Photographers List

Photo Top 100

I have personally taken, edited, and captioned these images, and I personally maintain this web
site for people to see and learn construction. Please email me (RICarr@RICarr.com) to tell me how
you use them and how I can correct or improve this site. Robert I. Carr, Ph.D., P.E.

You may use my animal shots free (without removing my signature) for educational /
recreational / "light" commercial use (but not for another web site).
Note: People in the shots
have NOT signed a model release. Dinosaur/animal shots are great for show and tell, framing and
hanging, photo albums, T-shirt prints, brochures, trade ads, training materials, and classes.

To download a full-size file: 1) Click on "save photo", or 2) Click on "O" (for "original" = very
large) then right Click on the picture, then Copy then Paste on your pc I take shots and add them
weekly, so come back to see more.

All materials, including figures and text, are copyrighted by me and may not be used "in bulk"
for commercial purposes or sales or on another web site without my express permission. Robert I.
Carr, Ph.D., P.E., 542 Heritage Drive, Ann Arbor, MI 48105, 734-665-8287,
Fax 734-665-1737, www.RICarr.com, RICarr@RICarr.com.

Go to MyConstructionPhotos.smugmug.com for the mother load of construction equipment shots:
Earthmoving, dozers, backhoes, scrapers, trucks, graders, loaders, haulers, cranes, steel erection,
concrete, demolition, bridges, safety, masonry, equipment, asphalt, buildings, roads, paving.

Links to me?

AAKSale